Helping children cope with the events of September 11

The children reading the names of those killed on 9/11 was a grim reminder that some of our youngest citizens were and still are affected by what happened two years ago. One problem, according to psychologists, is there is no way of being sure what the long-term effects might be, since there was never a major terrorist attack before September 11, 2001.Dr. Danielle Thau of Stamford says there are several warning signs parents should look for in their children:Lack of emotionLingering fearsPre-occupation with danger and securityIncreased aggression or fanatical patriotismThau says the best way to deal with a child that is expressing those feelings is to sit down and talk with them. Helping children to articulate their fears is an important step in the healing process. Thau also says reassuring children that they are safe at home is important to help children get over their fears.

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