Stamford protesters blame drugmaker for opioid deaths

Posted: Updated:
STAMFORD -

About 300 protesters converged on downtown Stamford Friday, saying they blame a major drugmaker for opioid deaths.

Families in attendance, many of whom have lost loved ones to addiction, say Purdue Pharma helped start the opioid crisis. The company's headquarters are located in Stamford.

Twenty-seven states and dozens of cities, including Bridgeport, are suing Purdue, claiming the company lied to patients and doctors about how addictive the drug OxyContin is.

WATCH: Extended video of protest

A Purdue spokesman says they are partnering with states to boost their drug monitoring programs.

"We share the protesters' concern about the opioid crisis, and respect their right to peacefully express themselves," he said.

Purdue says the feds continue to approve and regulate OxyContin.

"It is inappropriate for the state to substitute its judgment for the judgment of the regulatory, scientific and medical experts at FDA," the spokesman said.

Organizers asked police to deliver a letter to Purdue's CEO. They're also planning to march on the White House in October.

Earlier this year, the company stopped marketing OxyContin to doctors and laid off hundreds of sales reps.

Last year, Purdue sold $1.7 billion worth of the drug.

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