State Judiciary Committee kills ride-sharing bill requiring posting of emergency number

Posted: Updated:
NORWALK -

The state Judiciary Committee killed a new bill designed to keep customers of Uber and Lyft more safe during rides.

On Monday, state lawmakers abandoned a plan for tougher safety rules. The proposal would have required ride shares to prominently display an emergency hotline number where someone would answer immediately.

But one Uber driver thinks the number is unnecessary.

"I know they do have a feature in the app where you can click and call 911, or you can click and send your location to somebody personal, exactly where you're at," says Tajay Kelly.

Lyft and Uber apps already show users the driver's name, face and license plate number. A new push notification will remind users to double-check all three.

The proposal for the bill comes after a college student in South Carolina was killed after she got into the wrong car. In Stamford, police say a man pretending to be an Uber driver raped two women.

No reason was given for abandoning the bill.

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