Harriet Tubman statue arrives in White Plains

The "Harriet Tubman - The Journey to Freedom" statue arrived in White Plains to a welcoming ceremony Saturday.
The bronze sculpture shows Tubman as she leads a young, enslaved girl to freedom.
The sculpture was created by Emmy and Academy award-winning sculptor Wesley Wofford. It stands 9 feet tall and weighs 2,400 pounds.
The "Journey to Freedom" statue was on a journey of its own before it finally arrived in White Plains, as it is part of an exhibition that travels nationwide.
The monument which is now on display at Renaissance Plaza was the object of appreciation and admiration among the cheerful and welcoming crowd.
Tubman was born a slave, but escaped. She returned to the south more than a dozen times to free hundreds of others held in bondage. She carried out the freedom raids with the help of anti-slavery activists and used safe houses called the "Underground Railroad".
Her great nephew, Abdul Tubman, said he is proud of her legacy and added that the statue serves as a powerful symbol to inspire others to thrive forward.
Those in attendance at the ceremony said they were excited to welcome the sculpture that's important to both Black and American history.
The sculpture will be on display in Renaissance Plaza until June 30.