Hartford HealthCare doctor: Ozempic for weight loss can cause malnutrition

Ozempic is a once-a-week injection that has been approved by the FDA for diabetes but not weight loss.

Mark Sudol

May 9, 2023, 9:40 PM

Updated 341 days ago

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As the Ozempic weight loss craze continues, patients are now seeing an extreme risk months later.
Doctors originally prescribed Ozempic for diabetes.
Over the last several months, patients have been taking it to lose weight.
"It slows down digestion and it sends a signal to the brain to not overeat," said Hartford HealthCare Dr. Andrew Wong.
But some people who have been taking Ozempic for several months are now seeing side effects.
"Once I got to the higher dose, I barely could eat anything. Totally fatigued a lot of the time," said a woman who wants to remain anonymous.
"People actually lose the elasticity and the collagen in the muscles in the face and that's one symptom of malnourishment that some not all but some people who are taking Ozempic will suffer from," said Wong.
Doctors say you still need to eat a healthy diet on the drug.
They say in some cases people forget to eat because they don't have a craving.
"Some people who are taking Ozempic are showing signs of, in fact, eating disorders so they eat irregularly, they skip meals, they eat late at night," said Wong.
Ozempic is a once-a-week injection that has been approved by the FDA for diabetes but not weight loss.
It can be approved for obesity.
"It's not just an easy fix just to lose weight. You really have to know your body and listen to your body about what foods to eat," said a woman who wants to remain anonymous. Doctors say if you're feeling nauseous it's not a bad idea to drink more water and take electrolytes. Doctors say patients who take Ozempic should eat meals that consist of 1000-1500 calories per day and include appropriate amounts of fiber, protein, fats and fruits and vegetables.


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