Ready for roadwork? CT has nearly 200 projects planned

In our area, the biggest project is in Norwalk. New ramps will finally let U.S. 7 drivers go north on the Merritt Parkway, while the southbound Merritt will finally connect to Route 7.

John Craven

May 17, 2024, 9:10 PM

Updated 58 days ago

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Hope you like orange construction cones, because you'll see a lot more of them over the next few years.
The Connecticut Department of Transportation is out with a new four-year plan, including nearly 200 projects worth $4 billion.
MERRITT PARKWAY & ROUTE 7
In our area, the biggest project is in Norwalk. New ramps will finally let U.S. 7 drivers go north on the Merritt Parkway, while the southbound Merritt will finally connect to Route 7. Expansion plans have been delayed for decades bogged down by a lawsuit and concerns from neighbors.
"I think it's good because traffic around here is getting ridiculous," said Ruth Shay-Johnson, of Norwalk.
Right now, CT DOT is deciding between two design options, with the "preferred route" adding two traffic signals on Route 7 instead of large flyover ramps.
"A LOT MORE LANE CLOSURES"
It's not just Norwalk.
The Department of Transportation's new 2025-28 Statewide Transportation Improvement Program includes 189 projects in every corner the state. Most are federally funded.
"They've got a lot of iron on the roads right now, like they're getting ready to tear it up," said Don Getner, of Norwalk.
But instead of major roadwork, most of these are smaller projects designed to shave a few minutes off your commute. For example, expect to see smoother lanes on I-95 in Stamford, as well as longer ramps at Exit 38 in Milford and Exit 9 along I-84 in Newtown.
"What we can do to fix those ramps, fix locations, reduce those conflict points, we'll have fewer crashes, less congestion, less delays," said DOT Commissioner Garrett Eucalitto.
DOT is also improving local roads in Bridgeport, Fairfield and four other southwestern Connecticut communities – including rehabbing the 140-year-old Saugatuck Swing Bridge in Westport.
"They're going to notice a lot more construction on our roadways over the next four years," Eucalitto said. "A lot more lane closures. They're going to need some patience."
The work goes beyond roads; a third of the money goes to mass transit. Metro-North rail lines and CTTransit buses will see more upgrades.
"NOT LIKE THE ROADS ARE THE PROBLEM"
Some drivers are skeptical that Connecticut traffic will ever get better.
"Because it's not like the roads are the problem," said Litzy Espinoza, of Norwalk. "It's the people sometimes."
You can comment on DOT's four-year plan until May 31. You can email DOT.STIPComments@ct.gov or send a letter to this address:
Mrs. Maribeth Wojenski
Transportation Assistant Planning Director
Bureau of Policy and Planning
Connecticut Department of Transportation
P.O. Box 317546
Newington, CT 06131-7546


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