Mom's rap video aims to raise awareness about Parkinson's disease

Joni Lowe, who opened her own dance studio years ago, has allowed her son Sequoia to help her step out of her comfort zone to teach others about her disease.

Mark Sudol

Jul 28, 2023, 8:30 AM

Updated 358 days ago

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A Brookfield man has produced a rap video about his mother's struggles with Parkinson's.
It's all because he wants to raise awareness and help others understand what she's going through.
Joni Lowe, who opened her own dance studio years ago, has allowed her son Sequoia to help her step out of her comfort zone to teach others about her disease.
"It's been 10 years, and I definitely see a progression of the disease unfortunately. I have a battery in my chest and I'm still shaking even though I'm on four different meds," said Joni Lowe, 54.
"She is not into rap music at all," said Sequoia Lowe.
But Sequoia convinced his mom and her friend Heather Kennedy in California to make this rap video about Parkinson's called Slim Shaky.
"I was like, 'Hey, I got your rapper name. Slim Shaky because you got Eminem's alter ego Slim Shady, and of course she has Parkinson's, she shakes," said Sequoia Lowe.
In the video Joni says, "So call me Slim, Shaky. I stand up even when I feel achy."
The video started as Sequoia's college senior project and has already gained popularity since its release earlier this month - getting over 6,000 views online and growing.
"I'm really happy how it turned out. He did a great job," said Joni Lowe.
Sequoia's sister Daisy even sings backup vocals. He wrote all the lyrics.
"The one that sticks with me is when she says, 'They say it keeps getting worse until you can't even eat, well try me buddy. I've got grandkids to meet,'" said Sequoia Lowe.
Sequoia admits it's been hard to watch his mother's health decline to the point where she needed brain surgery.
"This is a very serious thing. It sucks. But we're still going to have fun with it. We're still going to take a positive outlook and approach, and we can still make something uplifting out of it," said Sequoia Lowe.
The video has raised over $3,000 for Parkinson's research with Team Fox of the Michael J. Fox Foundation.
The video and fundraiser can be found here.


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