Connecticut's New England Carousel Museum dedicated to preservation of timeless attraction

The merry-go-round has made memories for children of all ages for quite some time. A museum in Bristol is dedicated to the preservation of the artform.
New England Carousel Museum Executive Director Morgan Urgo says carousels originated back in the Middle Ages.When they came to America in the 1880s up until the 1930s, it was the goldenage of carousels.
"At that time in American history, we had primarily European immigrants that came over, and they had traditions of being furniture makers. And the carousel industry was booming and so that's where they found their work," Urgo says.
She says some of the figures at the museum are 100- to 120-year-old wood carvings.
"We estimate that it takes about 700 hours to carve one piece," she says.
She says most carousels have a musical component and that early carousels had just a drummer that would play music.
Urgo says the New England Carousel Museum is an active working museum that you can come see and watch people in action.Both master and apprentice painters can be seen working at the museum on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays.
"Our mission is really to preserve and protect the few carousels that do remain. There are 200 antique carousels in the United States and that's down from about 2,000.