Norwalk company's custom truck was key tool to putting out I-95 tanker fire

King Industries' fire chief, Tim Morrissette, who is also a retired Norwalk firefighter tells News 12 that they "designed this truck for flammable liquid fires to have here at the plant, so we have a large capability to put out a lot of fire."

Greg Thompson

May 3, 2024, 9:02 PM

Updated 18 days ago

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Firefighters say a custom truck made for Norwalk chemical manufacturing company King Industries was a key tool in putting out Thursday's tanker fire on I-95.
Deputy Chief Stephen Shay, the shift commander for the Norwalk Fire Department, explains that ""water won't put out gasoline," which is why they needed firefighting foam that separates the gasoline from the oxygen and the fire goes out."
The problem is that fire trucks only carry five-gallon containers of the foam concentrate, and first responder knew they would need more.
So they called King, which is about a mile away, and they knew had their Quick Response Vehicle - or "QRV" - which holds 300.
King's fire chief, Tim Morrissette, who is also a retired Norwalk firefighter tells News 12 that they "designed this truck for flammable liquid fires to have here at the plant, so we have a large capability to put out a lot of fire."
Still, in the two years they have had the QRV, King vice president of Operations Bob King says Thursday was the first time it has actually been deployed.
"When I looked on the news, it was 'oh my goodness,' he remembers, "and then I saw a picture of a truck there, and then I see the foam and I'm 'Oh wow, they really used it.'"
The truck used a newer, environmentally-friendly foam without chemicals called PFAS, as had been mandated by Connecticut law since October.
King's fire crew, which includes multiple former and current Norwalk firefighters, got the flames under control within 10 minutes.
"That's what we designed the truck for," says Morrissette. "We had the right tool for the job, and we were able to help out."
In the time since the fire, officials at King say multiple organizations from around the state have been calling them to ask about the QRV, and see about getting something similar for themselves.


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