Supreme Court’s travel ban decision rattles local immigrants

<p>Many Muslim immigrants across Connecticut say they're frightened after the Supreme Court decided to allow President Donald Trump's travel ban to be fully enforced -- at least temporarily while the case is appealed.&nbsp;</p>

News 12 Staff

Dec 5, 2017, 7:54 PM

Updated 2,365 days ago

Share:

Many Muslim immigrants across Connecticut say they're frightened after the Supreme Court decided to allow President Donald Trump's travel ban to be fully enforced -- at least temporarily while the case is appealed.
Miriam Fawaz, a Syrian refugee living with her husband and three children in Bridgeport, says the justices' decision is heartbreaking.
The ban prohibits nearly all immigrants from several countries, six of them mostly Muslim, to enter the United States. Those countries are Chad, Iran, Libya, Syria, Somalia, Yemen and North Korea. It also bars some groups of Venezuelans from entering the U.S.
Fawaz says her brother and mother-in-law, both of whom received approval to move to the U.S. last year, are no longer able to come -- leaving them stranded in war-torn Syria.
"It's very dangerous," she says. "I don't feel safe there. I could get kidnapped, and my kids could get kidnapped as well.".
Alicia Kingsman from the Connecticut Institute for Refugees and Immigrants says the relatives had gone through at least a year of multiple background checks, even physicals.
"They've done everything we've asked of them, and now we're shutting our doors at a time where many of them need this place for refuge the most," she says. "It's un-American. It's unfair. It's unjust."
Lower courts are still hearing some appeals on the travel ban. Once those cases reach decisions, the Supreme Court is expected to make its final ruling on whether the travel ban is legal.


More from News 12