Yale blood specialist: J&J vaccine receivers shouldn’t panic but should monitor for symptoms

Dr. George Goshua, a blood specialist, says 20% of ICU COVID-19 patients show some blood clotting. Of around 7 million doses of Johnson & Johnson vaccine administered so far in the U.S., six women have developed clots.

News 12 Staff

Apr 13, 2021, 7:22 PM

Updated 1,137 days ago

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Doctors at Yale Medicine are reminding patients that a pause is different than a halt and that those who already received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine should not panic.
Dr. George Goshua, a blood specialist, says 20% of ICU COVID-19 patients show some blood clotting. Of around 7 million doses of Johnson & Johnson vaccine administered so far in the U.S., six women have developed clots.
Dr. Goshua says clinical trials of AstraZeneca's vaccine, which uses a similar delivery method, have shown a similar remote risk. He says to watch out for worsening headaches, abdominal pains and diarrhea.
“We would expect those symptoms to be occurring somewhere in the one- to two-week range,” he says. “But regardless, because we don't know enough, I'm telling folks to watch for these symptoms even in the first couple of days and contact your doctor if you have those. Because there are things we can do."
Dr. Goshua says one of the best ways to help prevent blood clots is simply by standing and adding some movement to your day. He recommends taking walks to break up long periods at a desk or on the couch.
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