Baltimore bridge collapses after powerless cargo ship rams into support column; 6 presumed dead

A major bridge in Baltimore snapped and collapsed after a container ship rammed into it early Tuesday, and several vehicles fell into the river below.

Associated Press

Mar 26, 2024, 8:56 AM

Updated 21 days ago

Share:

Baltimore bridge collapses after powerless cargo ship rams into support column; 6 presumed dead
A cargo ship lost power and rammed into a major bridge in Baltimore early Tuesday, destroying the span in a matter of seconds and plunging it into the river in a terrifying collapse that could disrupt a vital shipping port for months. Six people were missing and presumed dead, and the search for them was suspended until the next day. The ship’s crew issued a mayday call moments before the crash took down the Francis Scott Key Bridge, enabling authorities to limit vehicle traffic on the span, Maryland’s governor said. The ship struck one of the bridge’s supports, causing the structure to collapse like a toy. A section of the span came to rest on the bow of the vessel, which caught fire. With the ship barreling toward the bridge at “a very, very rapid speed,” authorities had just enough time to stop cars from coming over the bridge, Maryland Gov. Wes Moore said. “These people are heroes,” Moore said. “They saved lives last night.” In the evening, Col. Roland L. Butler Jr., superintendent for Maryland State Police, announced that the search and rescue mission was transitioning to one of search and recovery. He also said the search was being put on pause and divers would return to the site at 6 a.m. Wednesday, when challenging overnight conditions are expected to improve. The crash happened in the middle of the night, long before the busy morning commute on the bridge that stretches 1.6 miles (2.6 km) and was used by 12 million vehicles last year. The six people still unaccounted for were part of a construction crew filling potholes on the bridge, said Paul Wiedefeld, the state's transportation secretary. A senior executive at the company that employed the workers said Tuesday afternoon that they were presumed dead, given the water’s depth and the length of time since the crash. Jeffrey Pritzker, executive vice president of Brawner Builders, said the crew was working in the middle of the bridge when it came down. No bodies have been recovered, and rescuers continued the search into the late afternoon. “This was so completely unforeseen,” Pritzker said. “We don’t know what else to say. We take such great pride in safety, and we have cones and signs and lights and barriers and flaggers." Jesus Campos, who has worked on the bridge for Brawner Builders and knows members of the crew, said he was told they were on a break and some were sitting in their trucks when the bridge went down. “I know that a month ago, I was there, and I know what it feels like when the trailers pass,” Campos said. “Imagine knowing that is falling. It is so hard. One would not know what to do.” Rescuers pulled two people out of the water. One person was treated at a hospital and discharged hours later. Multiple vehicles also went into the river, although authorities did not believe anyone was inside. “It looked like something out of an action movie,” Baltimore Mayor Brandon Scott said, calling it “an unthinkable tragedy." A police dispatcher put out a call just before the collapse saying a ship had lost its steering and asked officers to stop all traffic on the bridge, according to Maryland Transportation Authority first responder radio traffic obtained from the Broadcastify.com archive. One officer who stopped traffic radioed that he was going to drive onto the bridge to alert the construction crew. But seconds later, a frantic officer said: “The whole bridge just fell down. Start, start whoever, everybody ... the whole bridge just collapsed.” On a separate radio channel for maintenance and construction workers, someone said officers were stopping traffic because a ship had lost steering. There was no follow-up order to evacuate, and 30 seconds later the bridge fell and the channel went silent. From 1960 to 2015, there were 35 major bridge collapses worldwide due to ship or barge collision, according to the World Association for Waterborne Transport Infrastructure. The collapse is sure to create a logistical nightmare for months, if not years, along the East Coast, shutting down ship traffic at the Port of Baltimore, a major shipping hub. The accident will also snarl cargo and commuter traffic. “Losing this bridge will devastate the entire area, as well as the entire East Coast,” Maryland state Sen. Johnny Ray Salling said. Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg, speaking at a news conference near the site, said it was too soon to estimate how long it will take to clear the channel, which is about 50 feet (15 meters) deep. “I do not know of a bridge that has been constructed to withstand a direct impact from a vessel of this size,” he said. Synergy Marine Group - which manages the ship, called the Dali - confirmed the vessel hit a pillar of the bridge at about 1:30 a.m. while in control of one or more pilots, who are local specialists who help guide vessels safely into and out of ports. The ship is owned by Grace Ocean Private Ltd. Synergy said all crew members and the two pilots on board were accounted for, and there were no reports of any injuries. The ship was moving at 8 knots, roughly 9 mph (14.8 kph), the governor said. Jagged remnants of the bridge could be seen jutting up from the water's surface. The on-ramp ended abruptly where the span once began. Donald Heinbuch, a retired chief with Baltimore’s fire department, said he was startled awake by a deep rumbling that shook his house for several seconds. “It felt like an earthquake,” he said. He drove to the river's edge and couldn’t believe what he saw. “The ship was there, and the bridge was in the water, like it was blown up,” he said. The bridge spans the Patapsco River at the entrance to a busy harbor, which leads to the Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Ocean. Opened in 1977, the bridge is named for the writer of “The Star-Spangled Banner.” Wiedefeld said all vessel traffic into and out of the port would be suspended until further notice, though the facility was still open to trucks. President Joe Biden said he planned to travel to Baltimore and intends for the federal government to pick up the entire cost of rebuilding. “This is going to take some time,” Biden said. The Dali was headed from Baltimore to Colombo, Sri Lanka, and flying under a Singapore flag, according to data from Marine Traffic. The container ship is about 985 feet (300 meters) long and about 157 feet (48 meters) wide, according to the website. Inspectors found a problem with the Dali’s machinery in June, but a more recent examination did not identify any deficiencies, according to the shipping information system Equasis. Danish shipping giant Maersk said it had chartered the vessel. Last year, the Port of Baltimore handled a record 52.3 million tons of foreign cargo worth $80 billion, according to the state. The head of a supply chain management company said Americans should expect shortages of goods from the effect of the collapse on ocean container shipping and East Coast trucking. “It’s not just the port of Baltimore that’s going to be impacted,” said Ryan Petersen, CEO of Flexport.
The collapse, though, is not likely to hurt worldwide trade because Baltimore is not a major port for container vessels, but its facilities are more important when it comes to goods such as farm equipment and autos, said Judah Levine, head of research for global freight booking platform Freightos.


More from News 12
2:07
FAFSA new application delay is affecting students across Connecticut

FAFSA new application delay is affecting students across Connecticut

2:05
Cooler temperatures, rain on the way for Connecticut

Cooler temperatures, rain on the way for Connecticut

0:30
Sikorsky plans to lay off employees following cancellation of U.S. Army program

Sikorsky plans to lay off employees following cancellation of U.S. Army program

0:41
Police: 2 suspects arrested for narcotics and illegal firearms in Bridgeport

Police: 2 suspects arrested for narcotics and illegal firearms in Bridgeport

2:34
Petitions fight parking plan approved for downtown Westport

Petitions fight parking plan approved for downtown Westport

0:18
Police: Waterbury man violated his restraining order and sexually assaulted victim in their home

Police: Waterbury man violated his restraining order and sexually assaulted victim in their home

0:34
Police: Bronx man arrested in Milford for aggressively banging on someone's motel room door, brandishing gun

Police: Bronx man arrested in Milford for aggressively banging on someone's motel room door, brandishing gun

0:25
Torrington woman pleads guilty to trading fake community service letters for cash, gift cards

Torrington woman pleads guilty to trading fake community service letters for cash, gift cards

0:39
CT chief public defender under fire following accusations of bullying, insubordination

CT chief public defender under fire following accusations of bullying, insubordination

2:28
Exclusive: Lost Stamford High School class ring turns up at seminary after almost 80 years

Exclusive: Lost Stamford High School class ring turns up at seminary after almost 80 years

2:18
Group recommends traffic stop audits for every officer after State Police ticket probe

Group recommends traffic stop audits for every officer after State Police ticket probe

0:17
Stratford Police close Short Beach Monday due to unruly youths

Stratford Police close Short Beach Monday due to unruly youths

0:37
Trumbull man who rammed police cruisers, sold drugs gets 8 years in prison

Trumbull man who rammed police cruisers, sold drugs gets 8 years in prison

2:59
Bridgeport residents vow to fight back evictions after an out-of-state developer buys multiple properties on the East Side

Bridgeport residents vow to fight back evictions after an out-of-state developer buys multiple properties on the East Side

0:21
Wilton police: Man arrested for impersonating an FBI agent

Wilton police: Man arrested for impersonating an FBI agent

2:41
Fourth generation owners lean on tradition to lead Currie’s Tires to 95 years

Fourth generation owners lean on tradition to lead Currie’s Tires to 95 years

3:22
Made In Connecticut: Amodex in Bridgeport has been cleaning up for over 65 years

Made In Connecticut: Amodex in Bridgeport has been cleaning up for over 65 years

0:21
Sally's Apizza is making its way to Norwalk later this year

Sally's Apizza is making its way to Norwalk later this year

Guide: Alcohol addiction recovery support and resources

Guide: Alcohol addiction recovery support and resources

1:49
Work Zone Safety Awareness Week: CT DOT shares roadway tips and safety measures

Work Zone Safety Awareness Week: CT DOT shares roadway tips and safety measures