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‘Letters of Love.’ Greenwich teen rallies support for children in immigration centers

Palomino said all of her work has been done for the hope that every letter can make a difference when it gets into the hands of one of the kids at the border.

Angelica Toruno and Robyn Karashik

Jan 28, 2024, 11:28 PM

Updated 175 days ago

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A Greenwich teen is forming a bridge of communication with children detained in immigration shelters at the border through her nonprofit organization Dreams United.
Kimberly Palomino, 17, moved from Mount Vernon, New York to Greenwich nearly a year ago. She's proudly the daughter of immigrants with roots in Peru. She said her personal connection to immigration gave her the inspiration for Dreams United.
"I think it's very important to embrace their identity and heritage,” said Palomino.
She said the nonprofit strives to connect young Americans with immigrant children being held in immigration centers through heartfelt letters written in Spanish and English.
“[They’re] a beacon of hope in times of loneliness for a lot of these children," said Palomino.
She started a “Letters of Love” campaign at her high school with the goal of getting more letters out. She even reached out to universities for more support.
"All these letters are going to make an impact on the lives of a lot of these immigrant children,” said Palomino.
Since then, she has collaborated with the University of Michigan, New York University, Columbia University and University of Pennsylvania.
Palomino said all of her work has been done for the hope that every letter can make a difference when it gets into the hands of one of the kids at the border.
"Although we might be different, come from different backgrounds and everything, I feel like one thing that unites us all is the pursuit of a better life and the wonder of dreams," said Palomino.
Palomino said there are plenty of children in the immigration centers who can use some words of esperanza, or hope, every day.
To learn more about Dreams United and how to send a letter, click here.


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