New state law mandates requirements for state animal shelters

Bridgeport Animal Control Officer Jennifer Merenda says Bridgeport Animal Control already complies with the law requiring state animal shelters to keep indoor temperatures for animals between 55-80 degrees, and make sure dogs have their own primary enclosures.

Mark Sudol

Jul 18, 2023, 9:56 PM

Updated 276 days ago

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A new state law is about to go into effect to protect animals at local shelters.
The bill was recently signed by Gov. Ned Lamont.
Bridgeport Animal Control Officer Jennifer Merenda says Bridgeport Animal Control already complies with the law requiring state animal shelters to keep indoor temperatures for animals between 55-80 degrees, and make sure dogs have their own primary enclosures.
"These bills can only help us encourage our municipalities to put the health and welfare of our animals that we keep in our municipal shelters as a priority," said Merenda.
"This is a bill that has updated standards for our animal shelters that hasn't been changed in over 50 years," said state Sen. Tony Hwang.
Hwang fought for this bill that is being enforced by the Department of Agriculture. He hopes this may save more animals.
"They don't care whether you're Democrat, Republican, you know Black, white or yellow they just care that when you show them love and support, they offer that in kind," said Hwang.
Municipal shelters in Connecticut house thousands of cats and dogs each year that need care.
"Animals can't speak out. It requires for us to be respectful and considerate in regards to being an advocate for these animals," said Hwang.
The new law goes into effect in October.
Hwang says many shelters and municipalities already have these standards.
Municipal shelters in Connecticut impound more than 333,000 cats and dogs over the last two decades.


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