Doctors: People who have smoked and are over 50 should be screened for lung cancer

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Nearly 5 million adults are recommended for a screening.

Tom Krosnowski and Rose Shannon

Nov 15, 2023, 5:52 PM

Updated 189 days ago

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New guidelines from the American Cancer Society say people who have smoked and are over 50 should be screened for lung cancer.
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Nearly five million adults are recommended for a screening.
St. Vincent's Medical Center uses technology called low-dose screening. Doctors say they are pain free and only take five minutes.
However, only 6% of eligible adults get one of them.
Kelli Hannan, a radiology manager, says people are exposed to less radiation. Hannan, who smoked for 30 years, got screened and doctors found nodules in her lungs.
Kelli Hannan, a radiology manager, says people are exposed to less radiation. Hannan, who smoked for 30 years, got screened and doctors found nodules in her lungs.
"Just the thought of, 'I want to live for my family, I want to live a great life and not be ill,' it takes minutes out of your day, and then you're good for a year. It's so filtered now, it's so clean. Going out to the beach will damage me more than having a CAT scan of my lungs," says Hannan.
Hannan says she has a few nodules that doctors are watching. She will go back to the doctor annually and her nodules will be measured to make sure they are not growing.
Doctors say early detection is critical.
"Lung cancer screening is aimed at that population, people who are very curable. Your chance of cure is much higher if we catch it at an early stage. Screening is aimed at that population," says Dr. Brian Whang, Hartford HealthCare medical director for lung cancer screening.
November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month.


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