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Nassau County doctor convicted of illegally prescribing around 93,000 mg of oxycodone to 1 patient

Nelson pleaded guilty to one count of unlawful distribution of oxycodone, but federal prosecutors believe he illegally provided controlled substances to at least 14 other patients.

Rachel Yonkunas

May 16, 2024, 10:23 PM

Updated 37 days ago

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A long-time Nassau County doctor was ordered to close his practice and surrender his license for overprescribing highly addictive pain pills, according to court documents.
Team 12 Investigates uncovered that Alan Nelson, of East Norwich, repeatedly prescribed at least 92,700 milligrams of oxycodone to a single patient between 2020 and 2021 for no legitimate medical purpose. According to court documents, Nelson admitted that he knew it was wrong.
The disgraced doctor had been practicing medicine for nearly 50 years. His East Norwich office on Oyster Bay Road is now shuttered and up for rent.
Nelson was forced to end his career as a doctor. The New York state Department of Health required Nelson to surrender his medical license at the end of April.
Nelson pleaded guilty to one count of unlawful distribution of oxycodone, but federal prosecutors believe he illegally provided controlled substances to at least 14 other patients. He was sentenced to six months in prison, three years of supervised released with six months of home confinement and must pay a $20,000 fine.
The former doctor’s conviction is another example of federal investigators cracking down on the opioid crisis—but it also shows that, despite all the new regulations in place, some doctors are still able to skirt the laws and unlawfully distribute opioids.
Advocates for those with substance use disorder said doctors have a responsibility to protect their communities and not feed the opioid epidemic, which remains the worst drug crisis in the nation’s history.
“There’s too many Long Island, New York and American families who have lost families in the wake of this tragedy so we need to keep the pressure on with unscrupulous prescribers,” said Steve Chassman, executive director for the Long Island Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (LICADD). “Making sure that these unscrupulous players are not only stopped from distributing lethal amounts of opioids, but also are stripped of their license and prosecuted.”
If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction, visit LICADD or call their hotline at 631-979-1700.


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