State police, Hartford Courant go to court over Lanza notebook

<p>Connecticut's Supreme Court is weighing whether to publicly release the personal belongings of Sandy Hook shooter Adam Lanza.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p>

News 12 Staff

Mar 1, 2018, 7:49 PM

Updated 2,274 days ago

Share:

Connecticut's Supreme Court is weighing whether to publicly release the personal belongings of Sandy Hook shooter Adam Lanza.
State police argue that releasing his items would put everyone's privacy at risk. 
"Is there a risk that some documents will not fall under an exemption and may be made public before the person really has an opportunity to protect that information?" asks state Supreme Court Justice Maria Araujo Kahn.
The Hartford Courant has been fighting for three years to see his notebook and other items, arguing the information could prevent another mass shooting.
"We think they will shed light on what was in the mind of a mass killer," says Andrew Julien, the newspaper's editor. "And in order to tell a complete story about what happened that horrible day, about what was in the mind of Adam Lanza, we think these documents are important."
A lawyer for the Courant argued in court that Connecticut's Freedom of Information Law requires state police to make the items public.
State police say property seized involuntarily is considered evidence and exempt from public disclosure.
"It's not a public record at all," says Steve Barry, the state's assistant attorney general.
But some justices seemed skeptical about the argument to keep evidence sealed once an investigation is over.
"This is a case where there will be no prosecution," says Justice Richard N. Palmer. "The investigation is over."


More from News 12